Category Archives: Latest News

Springtime! Galas and more

If you’re looking for musical diversion in the coming weeks, here’s a quick roundup of my springtime antics:

You’ll find me at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine on April 9, 7:30pm for a program entitled “Immigrants – A Celebration of What Makes New York Great“. The Cathedral Choir joins forces with instrumental ensemble Rose of the Compass to perform works by composers including Vincent Persichetti, whose parents came from Italy and Germany; F. Melius Christiansen, the great founder of the St. Olaf Choir; Rebecca Clarke and Tarik O’Regan, who both emigrated from the British Isles; Jean Berger from Germany; and Igor Stravinksy from Russia. Click here for more information.

April 11-17 it’s time for some fun at the Philharmonic! I’ll be a member of the chorus for five performances in which the Oscar-winning movie Amadeus will be projected on a giant screen while the New York Philharmonic plays the soundtrack, live. Click for details.

Later in the month, on Saturday, April 28 in Short Hills, NJ, I’ll be singing opera arias and duets with baritone Daniel Hoy at a gala fundraiser to benefit All The Way Up!, an Adult Education Center in Newark. The following weekend, on May 5, I will join the Christopher Caines Dance company along with pianist Paul Kerekes and other fine musicians for a special dance-and-music installation performance (followed by a party!) in a grand apartment on the Upper East Side with sweeping views of the East River. Space is limited. Buy your tickets now!.

La Calisto reviewed by New York Classical Review

Alison Taylor Cheeseman mined comic gold in the dual role of the goddess Diana and Jove disguised as Diana for the purpose of making love to Callisto. (I am not making this up.)  The dignified goddess struggled girlishly with her vow of chastity when it came to the handsome poet Endymion. … When the singer added a touch of masculine swagger, all of a sudden there was the king of the gods plotting his latest conquest. Cheeseman delivered it all with firm voice and striking presence. — David Wright, New York Classical Review