Category Archives: Reviews

La Calisto reviewed by New York Classical Review

Alison Taylor Cheeseman mined comic gold in the dual role of the goddess Diana and Jove disguised as Diana for the purpose of making love to Callisto. (I am not making this up.)  The dignified goddess struggled girlishly with her vow of chastity when it came to the handsome poet Endymion. … When the singer added a touch of masculine swagger, all of a sudden there was the king of the gods plotting his latest conquest. Cheeseman delivered it all with firm voice and striking presence. — David Wright, New York Classical Review

Le nozze di Figaro reviewed by Allegri con Fuoco

Le nozze di Figaro was definitely the highlight of the festival…. After thoroughly enjoying her in Monteverdi’s L’incoronazione di Poppea two years ago, mezzo Alison Cheeseman didn’t have as much to work with here as she did in the role of Nero back then but she was a terrific Marcellina, both vocally and acting-wise. It is truly exciting to watch talented singers like her grow. ~ Allegri con fuoco ~ Click here to read the full review of dell’Arte Opera Ensemble’s Summer 2015 season

Ariadne auf Naxos reviewed by Tami Swartz

The standouts from the June 6th performance were Halley Gilbert as Zerbinetta and Alison Cheeseman as The Composer. […] Alison Cheeseman’s Composer is beautifully sung and intelligently portrayed. She does not take the bait of self-pity every time there is a threat to the integrity of her opera, but rather comes to that anger and despair from a strong position which makes each moment believable.

New York Times review: L’incoronazione di Poppea

“Dell’Arte serves as a training ground for rising young singers, and the vocal performances here spoke well for its efforts. Greer Davis, a soprano, was wonderful as Poppea, clear-voiced and self-possessed; Alison Taylor Cheeseman, a mezzo-soprano, was also lovely and sturdy as Nerone. Their blend was excellent in “Pur ti miro.””
James R. Oestreich, The New York Times

Parterre Box review: L’incoronazione di Poppea

“Nobly abiding by the composer’s prescribed vocal ranges, the production featured a mezzo as Nerone, the brooding and fiery Alison Cheeseman… Looking remarkably like a young Patti Smith, Cheeseman commanded the role’s wide-ranging vocal and dramatic compass—from raging at the roadblocks Ottavia and Seneca throw in his way to swooning at his lover’s demanding charms.
As Poppea, Greer Davis was a bewitching young seductress on the make…  their powerful erotic connection held the evening’s focus.”

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